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WI-Standards

Wisconsin Standards Alignment

We Cover 94% of the Model Academic Standards in Wisconsin.

Generation Genius LessonStateStandards DocumentGradeState IDStandardsSort
Patterns in the Sky;WIStandardsGrade 1SCI.ESS1.A.1Patterns of movement of the sun, moon, and stars, as seen from Earth, can be observed, described, and predicted.1
Four Seasons and Day Length;WIStandardsGrade 1SCI.ESS1.B.1Seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset can be observed, described, and predicted.1
Timescale of Earth's Events;WIStandardsGrade 2SCI.ESS1.C.2Some events on Earth occur very quickly; others can occur very slowly.1
Changing the Shape of Land;WIStandardsGrade 2SCI.ESS2.A.2Wind and water change the shape of the land.1
Maps of Landforms;WIStandardsGrade 2SCI.ESS2.B.2Maps show where things are located. One can map the shapes and kinds of land and water in any area.1
Oceans, Lakes and Rivers;WIStandardsGrade 2SCI.ESS2.C.2Water is found in many types of places and in different forms on Earth.1
Introduction to Weather;WIStandardsKindegartenSCI.ESS2.D.KWeather is the combination of sunlight, wind, snow or rain, and temperature in a particular region and time. People record weather patterns over time.1
Living Things Change Their Environment;WIStandardsKindegartenSCI.ESS2.E.KPlants and animals can change their local environment.1
Habitats; Animals Need Food; Living vs. Non-Living Things;WIStandardsKindegartenSCI.ESS3.A.KLiving things need water, air, and resources from the land, and they live in places that have the things they need. Humans use natural resources for everything they do.1
Introduction to Weather;WIStandardsKindegartenSCI.ESS3.B.KIn a region, some kinds of severe weather are more likely than others. Forecasts allow communities to prepare for severe weather.1
Reducing Our Impact on Earth; Natural Resources;WIStandardsKindegartenSCI.ESS3.C.KThings people do can affect the environment but they can make choices to reduce their impacts.1
What is Engineering?;WIStandardsGrades K-2SCI.ETS1.A.K-2.iA situation that people want to change or create can be approached as a problem to be solved through engineering.1
What is Engineering?;WIStandardsGrades K-2SCI.ETS1.A.K-2.iiAsking questions, making observations, and gathering information are helpful in thinking about problems.1
What is Engineering?;WIStandardsGrades K-2SCI.ETS1.A.K-2.iiiBefore beginning to design a solution, it is important to clearly understand the problem.1
What is Engineering?;WIStandardsGrades K-2SCI.ETS1.B.K-2Designs can be conveyed through sketches, drawings, or physical models. These representations are useful in communicating ideas for a problem’s solutions to other people.1
What is Engineering?;WIStandardsGrades K-2SCI.ETS1.C.K-2Because there is more than one possible solution to a problem, it is useful to compare and test designs.1
What is Engineering?; What Is Science?WIStandardsGrades K-2SCI.ETS2.A.K-2Science and engineering involve the use of tools to observe and measure things.1
Natural Resources;WIStandardsGrades K-2SCI.ETS2.B.K-2.iEvery human-made product is designed by applying some knowledge of the natural world and is built by using natural materials.1
Reducing Our Impact on Earth;WIStandardsGrades K-2SCI.ETS2.B.K-2.iiTaking natural materials to make things impacts the environment.1
What Is Science?;WIStandardsGrades K-2SCI.ETS3.A.K-2.iPeople of diverse backgrounds can become scientists and engineers.1
What Is Science?; What is Engineering?;WIStandardsGrades K-2SCI.ETS3.A.K-2.iiPeople have practiced science and engineering for a long time.1
What is Engineering?;WIStandardsGrades K-2SCI.ETS3.A.K-2.iiiCreativity and imagination are important to science and engineering.1
What Is Science?;WIStandardsGrades K-2SCI.ETS3.B.K-2.iScientists use evidence to explain the natural world.1
WIStandardsGrades K-2SCI.ETS3.B.K-2.iiScience assumes natural events happen today as they happened in the past.1
What is Engineering?;WIStandardsGrades K-2SCI.ETS3.B.K-2.iiiEngineers solve problems to meet the needs of people and communities.1
What is Engineering?;WIStandardsGrades K-2SCI.ETS3.C.K-2.iScience and engineers use many approaches to answer questions about the natural world and solve problems.1
What Is Science?;WIStandardsGrades K-2SCI.ETS3.C.K-2.iiScientific explanations are strengthened by being supported with evidence.1
What is Engineering?;WIStandardsGrades K-2SCI.ETS3.C.K-2.iiiAn engineering problem can have many solutions. The strength of a solution depends on how well it solves the problem.1
Parts of a Plant; External Animal Parts;WIStandardsGrade 1SCI.LS1.A.1All organisms have external parts that they use to perform daily functions.1
Animals Help Their Babies Survive;WIStandardsGrade 1SCI.LS1.B.1Parents and offspring often engage in behaviors that help the offspring survive.1
Plants Need Water And Light; Animals Need Food;WIStandardsKindegartenSCI.LS1.C.KAnimals obtain food they need from plants or other animals. Plants need water and light.1
The Five Senses;WIStandardsGrade 1SCI.LS1.D.1Animals sense and communicate information and respond to inputs with behaviors that help them grow and survive.1
Pollination and Seed Dispersal; Plants Need Water And Light;WIStandardsGrade 2SCI.LS2.A.2Plants depend on water and light to grow. Plants depend on animals for pollination or to move their seeds around.1
Introduction to Traits;WIStandardsGrade 1SCI.LS3.A.1Young organisms are very much, but not exactly, like their parents, and also resemble other organisms of the same kind.1
Introduction to Traits;WIStandardsGrade 1SCI.LS3.B.1Individuals of the same kind of plant or animal are recognizable as similar, but can also vary in many ways.1
Biodiversity of Life on Earth;WIStandardsGrade 2SCI.LS4.D.2There are many different kinds of living things in any area, and they exist in different places on land and in water.1
Solids, Liquids and Gases; Material Properties and Purposes;WIStandardsGrade 2SCI.PS1.A.2Matter exists as different substances that have different observable properties. Different properties are suited to different purposes. Objects can be built up from smaller parts.1
Heating and Cooling;WIStandardsGrade 2SCI.PS1.B.2Heating or cooling a substance may cause changes that can be observed. Sometimes these changes are reversible, and sometimes they are not.1
Pushes and Pulls;WIStandardsKindegartenSCI.PS2.A.K.iPushes and pulls can have different strengths and directions, and can change the speed or direction of an object’s motion, or start or stop it.1
Pushes and Pulls;WIStandardsKindegartenSCI.PS2.A.K.iiA bigger push or pull makes things speed up or slow down more quickly.1
Pushes and Pulls;WIStandardsKindegartenSCI.PS2.B.KWhen objects touch or collide, they push on one another and can result in a change of motion.1
Pushes and Pulls;WIStandardsKindegartenSCI.PS3.C.KBigger pushes and pulls cause bigger changes in an object’s motion or shape.1
Sunlight Warms the Earth;WIStandardsKindegartenSCI.PS3.D.KSunlight warms Earth’s surface.1
Introduction to Sound;WIStandardsGrade 1SCI.PS4.A.1Sound can make matter vibrate, and vibrating matter can make sound.1
Introduction to Light;WIStandardsGrade 1SCI.PS4.B.1Objects can be seen only when light is available to illuminate them.1
Communication Over Distances;WIStandardsGrade 1SCI.PS4.C.1People use devices to send and receive information.1
Weather vs. Climate;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 3SCI.ESS2.D.3Climate describes patterns of typical weather conditions over different scales and variations. Historical weather patterns can be analyzed.2
Extreme Weather Solutions; Natural Disasters;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 3SCI.ESS3.B.3A variety of hazards result from natural processes; humans cannot eliminate hazards but can reduce their impacts.2
Animal & Plant Life Cycles;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 3SCI.LS1.B.3Reproduction is essential to every kind of organism. Organisms have unique and diverse life cycles.2
Ecosystems; Adaptations and the Environment;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 3SCI.LS2.C.3When the environment changes, some organisms survive and reproduce, some move to new locations, some move into transformed environments, and some die.2
Animal Group Behavior;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 3SCI.LS2.D.3Being part of a group helps animals obtain food, defend themselves, and cope with changes.2
Variation of Traits;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 3SCI.LS3.A.3Many characteristics of organisms are inherited from their parents. Other characteristics result from individuals’ interactions with the environment. Many characteristics involve both inheritance and environment.2
Variation of Traits;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 3SCI.LS3.B.3Different organisms vary in how they look and function because they have different inherited information; the environment also affects the traits that an organism develops.2
Fossils & Extinction; Earth's Landscapes;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 3SCI.LS4.A.3Some living organisms resemble organisms that once lived on Earth. Fossils provide evidence about the types of organisms and environments that existed long ago.2
Variation of Traits;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 3SCI.LS4.B.3Differences in characteristics between individuals of the same species provide advantages in surviving and reproducing.2
Ecosystems; Adaptations and the Environment;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 3SCI.LS4.C.3Particular organisms can only survive in particular environments.2
Ecosystems;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 3SCI.LS4.D.3Populations of organisms live in a variety of habitats. Change in those habitats affects the organisms living there.2
Balanced & Unbalanced Forces;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 3SCI.PS2.A.3.iQualities of motion and changes in motion require description of both size and direction.2
Balanced & Unbalanced Forces;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 3SCI.PS2.A.3.iiThe effect of unbalanced forces on an object results in a change of motion.2
Patterns of Motion & Friction;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 3SCI.PS2.A.3.iiiPatterns of motion can be used to predict future motion.2
Magnets & Static Electricty;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 3SCI.PS2.B.3Some forces act through contact, some forces (e.g., magnetic, electrostatic) act even when the objects are not in contact.2
Earth's Landscapes;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 4SCI.ESS1.C.4Certain features on Earth can be used to order events that have occurred in a landscape.2
Weathering & Erosion; Interactions of Earth’s Spheres; Ecosystems;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 4SCI.ESS2.A.4Four major Earth systems interact. Rainfall helps to shape the land and affects the types of living things found in a region. Water, ice, wind, organisms, and gravity break rocks, soils, and sediments into smaller pieces and move them around.2
Natural Disasters;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 4SCI.ESS2.B.4Earth’s physical features occur in patterns, as do earthquakes and volcanoes. Maps can be used to locate features and determine patterns in those events.2
Weathering & Erosion;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 4SCI.ESS2.E.4Living things can affect the physical characteristics of their environment.2
Renewable vs. Nonrenewable Resources;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 4SCI.ESS3.A.4Energy and fuels humans use are derived from natural sources, and their use affects the environment. Some resources are renewable over time, others are not.2
Extreme Weather Solutions; Natural Disasters;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 4SCI.ESS3.B.4A variety of hazards result from natural processes; humans cannot eliminate hazards but can reduce their impacts.2
Brain Processing of Senses;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 4SCI.LS1.A.4Plants and animals have both internal and external macroscopic structures that allow for growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction.2
Brain Processing of Senses; Light Reflection & Vision;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 4SCI.LS1.D.4Different sense receptors are specialized for particular kinds of information; animals use their perceptions and memories to guide their actions.2
Collisions;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 4SCI.PS3.A.4Moving objects contain energy. The faster the object moves, the more energy it has.2
Collisions; Renewable vs. Nonrenewable Resources; Energy Transfer; Wave Properties;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 4SCI.PS3.B.4Energy can be moved from place to place by moving objects, or through sound, light, or electrical currents. Energy can be converted from one form to another form.2
Collisions;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 4SCI.PS3.C.4When objects collide, contact forces transfer energy so as to change objects’ motions.2
Renewable vs. Nonrenewable Resources; How Do We Use Food; Food Webs;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 4SCI.PS3.D.4.iPlants capture energy from sunlight which can be used as fuel or food.2
Renewable vs. Nonrenewable Resources; How Do We Use Food; Energy Transfer;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 4SCI.PS3.D.4.iiStored energy in food or fuel can be converted to useable energy.2
Wave Properties;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 4SCI.PS4.A.4Waves are regular patterns of motion, which can be made in water by disturbing the surface. Waves of the same type can differ in amplitude and wavelength. Waves can make objects move.2
Light Reflection & Vision;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 4SCI.PS4.B.4Objects can be seen when light reflected from their surface enters our eyes.2
Information Transfer;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 4SCI.PS4.C.4Patterns can encode, send, receive, and decode information.2
Sun and Other Stars;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 5SCI.ESS1.A.5Stars range greatly in size and distance from Earth, and this can explain their relative brightness.2
Moon & Its Phases; Earth’s Orbit and Rotation; Sun and Other Stars;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 5SCI.ESS1.B.5The Earth’s orbit and rotation, and the orbit of the moon around the Earth cause observable patterns.2
Water Cycle; Weathering & Erosion; Interactions of Earth’s Spheres;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 5SCI.ESS2.A.5Four major Earth systems interact. Rainfall helps to shape the land and affects the types of living things found in a region. Water, ice, wind, organisms, and gravity break rocks, soils, and sediments into smaller pieces and move them around.2
Water Quality & Distribution;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 5SCI.ESS2.C.5Most of Earth’s water is in the ocean, and much of the Earth’s freshwater is in glaciers or underground.2
Renewable vs. Nonrenewable Resources; Water Quality & Distribution; Interactions of Earth’s Spheres; Ecosystems;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 5SCI.ESS3.C.5Societal activities have had major effects on the land, ocean, atmosphere, and even outer space. Societal activities can also help protect Earth’s resources and environments.2
How Do We Use Food;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 5SCI.LS1.C.5Food provides animals with the materials and energy they need for body repair, growth, warmth, and motion. Plants acquire material for growth chiefly from air, water, and process matter, and obtain energy from sunlight, which is used to maintain conditions necessary for survival.2
How Do We Use Food; Food Webs;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 5SCI.LS2.A.5The food of almost any animal can be traced back to plants. Organisms are related in food webs in which some animals eat plants for food and other animals eat the animals that eat plants, while decomposers restore some materials back to the soil.2
Ecosystems;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 5SCI.LS2.B.5Matter cycles between the air and soil and among organisms as they live and die.2
Particle Nature of Matter; Conservation of Matter;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 5SCI.PS1.A.5Matter exists as particles that are too small to see. Matter is always conserved even if it seems to disappear. Measurements of a variety of observable properties can be used to identify particular materials.2
Properties of Matter; Chemical vs. Physical Changes;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 5SCI.PS1.B.5.iChemical reactions that occur when substances are mixed can be identified by the emergence of substances with different properties.2
Conservation of Matter;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 5SCI.PS1.B.5.iiIn chemical reactions the total mass remains the same.2
Balanced & Unbalanced Forces;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 5SCI.PS2.B.5The gravitational force of Earth acting on an object near Earth’s surface pulls that object toward the planet’s center.2
Renewable vs. Nonrenewable Resources; How Do We Use Food; Food Webs;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 5SCI.PS3.D.5.iPlants capture energy from sunlight which can be used as fuel or food.2
Renewable vs. Nonrenewable Resources; How Do We Use Food; Energy Transfer;WIModel Academic StandardsGrade 5SCI.PS3.D.5.iiStored energy in food or fuel can be converted to useable energy.2
Renewable vs. Nonrenewable Resources; Extreme Weather Solutions; Natural Disasters; What Is Science?;WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS1.A.3-5Possible solutions to a problem are limited by available materials and resources (constraints). The success of a designed solution is determined by considering the desired features of a solution (criteria). Different proposals for solutions can be compared on the basis of how well each one meets the specified criteria for success or how well each takes the constraints into account.2
Renewable vs. Nonrenewable Resources; Extreme Weather Solutions; Natural Disasters;WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS1.B.3-5.iResearch on a problem should be carried out before beginning to design a solution. Testing a solution involves investigating how well it performs under a range of likely conditions.2
Renewable vs. Nonrenewable Resources; Extreme Weather Solutions; What Is Science?; Structure of Living Things;WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS1.B.3-5.iiAt whatever stage, communicating with peers about proposed solutions is an important part of the design process, and shared ideas can lead to improved designs.2
Renewable vs. Nonrenewable Resources; Extreme Weather Solutions; What Is Science?;WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS1.B.3-5.iiiTests are often designed to identify failure points or difficulties, which suggest the elements of the design that need to be improved.2
Renewable vs. Nonrenewable Resources; Extreme Weather Solutions; What Is Science?;WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS1.C.3-5Different solutions need to be tested in order to determine which of them best solves the problem, given the criteria and the constraints.2
Information Transfer;WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS2.A.3-5.iScience and technology support each other.2
WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS2.A.3-5.iiTools and instruments are used to answer scientific questions, while scientific discoveries lead to the development of new technologies.2
WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS2.B.3-5.iPeople’s needs and wants change over time, as do their demands for new and improved technologies.2
Extreme Weather Solutions;WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS2.B.3-5.iiEngineers improve existing technologies or develop new ones to increase their benefits, decrease known risks, and meet societal demands.2
What Is Science?WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS2.B.3-5.iiiWhen new technologies become available, they can bring about changes in the way people live and interact with one another.2
Real World Science Segments (Mulitple Episodes)WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS3.A.3-5.iScience and engineering knowledge have been created by many cultures.2
What Is Science?; Fossils & Extinction;WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS3.A.3-5.iiPeople use the tools and practices of science and engineering in many different situations (e.g., land managers, technicians, nurses and welders).2
What Is Science?;WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS3.A.3-5.iiiScience and engineering affect everyday life.2
What Is Science?;WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS3.B.3-5.iScience and engineering are both bodies of knowledge and processes that add new knowledge to our understanding.2
What Is Science?;WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS3.B.3-5.iiScientific findings are limited to what can be supported with evidence from the natural world.2
WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS3.B.3-5.iiiBasic laws of nature are the same everywhere in the universe (e.g., gravity, conservation of matter, energy transfer, etc.).2
Extreme Weather SolutionsWIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS3.B.3-5.ivEngineering solutions often have drawbacks as well as benefits.2
What Is Science?;WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS3.C.3-5.iThe products of science and engineering are not developed through one set “scientific method” or “engineering design process.” Instead, they use a variety of approaches described in the Science and Engineering Practices.2
Weathering & Erosion; What Is Science?;WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS3.C.3-5.iiScience explanations are based on a body of evidence and multiple tests, and describe the mechanisms for natural events. Science explanations can change based on new evidence.2
What Is Science?;WIModel Academic StandardsGrades 3-5SCI.ETS3.C.3-5.iiiThere is no perfect design in engineering. Designs that are best in some ways (e.g., safety or ease of use) may be inferior in other ways (e.g., cost or aesthetics).2

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